Welcome to CITYFOOTCARE.COM,
Lawrence Silverbergthe Internet home of Drs. Emanuel Sergi and Lawrence Silverberg, the most compassionate and skilled foot doctors in the New York City Metro area and the country.

Dr. Silverberg is Board Certified by the American Board of Podiatric Surgery. Our office is conveniently located in Midtown Manhattan near Grand Central Station.

We take great pride in providing excellent medical care along with great bedside manner and take the extra time to explain your problems and the treatment options in detail.

At City Footcare we treat all problems related to the foot and ankle. We use state of the art diagnostic and therapeutic equipment.

The doctors believes in patient education, and patient participation in their care. We take pride in spending time with our patients and listening to them. Our patients never feel rushed. We also take the time to explain patients problems in detail and spell out explicit treatment plans.

When your problem requires surgery, you can rest assured that you are in the hands of a competent and highly trained surgeon. Drs. Sergi and Silverberg have been called the best foot surgeons in NYC and the best bunion surgeons in NYC. The doctors perform all foot and ankle surgery including traditional open surgery, minimally invasive surgery, laser surgery, radio frequency surgery and extra-corporeal shock wave therapy. Drs. Sergi and Silverberg are experts in all aspects of foot surgery. They are very detail oriented from start to finish. A good surgical outcome starts prior to entering the operating room. After expertly diagnosing patients’ conditions, they plan out the procedures with great skill. In the operating room they are skillful and precise. they also take into consideration aesthetics with incision planning and plastic surgery type suturing techniques.

They is hospital and surgery center affiliated.

To resolve all of your foot and ankle problems, simply look around this site and make an appointment with Drs. Sergi and Silverberg today. Your feet will be glad you did!

Please see the medical DISCLAIMER on the ‘about this blog page‘.

A metaphor of how insurance companies and doctors interact. A great explanation for the layperson.

I did not write the article below in this blog post. I read this article from 2009 and was so impressed I decided to repost it here. I loved how it explains what physicians go through with insurance companies.

A great explanation about insurance companies for the layperson.

Physicians are really interested in provided excellent health care while covering our very high overhead for business and making some profit at the same time. Everyone goes to work to make money, including doctors. Speaking for myself, and I’m sure most of my colleagues, we feel as though we should be compensated well for providing such a necessary service, taking care of illness and injury, our years of higher education and post-graduate training, and the high cost of malpractice insurance with the added risk of being sued by malpractice attorneys.

The insurance companies, on the other hand, are only about making profits for their shareholders and officers. Their share price does not reflect the health care provided to their customers, only how much profit they can report.

In my 13 years of practice I’ve seen the situation get worse and worse with insurance companies paying less and less, and patients out of pocket expenses going up more and more. Add that to the annual increase in insurance premiums paid by patients and their employers and it creates negative emotions. I hear all the time from patients complaining that their insurance premiums have gone up and their responsibilities to pay the doctors have also gone up.

I have had to hire additional employees just to try to get paid from insurance companies because they deny more and more claims all the time. My accounts receivable is the biggest it has every been. We are constantly fighting to get paid. Patients get seen and we often do not get reimbursed from the insurance companies, only partially reimbursed, or paid months after the service was provided. Patients do not appreciate getting billed at all for services when they pay so much money for insurance, and also don’t understand why we bill them many months later after we are done fighting with the insurances and the claims were denied.


The below article is a great metaphor of how this third party payer system works from the providers point of view. Enjoy…


How do doctors get paid?

Imagine going to your favorite restaurant.  You are greeted at the door by the hostess, who seats you and takes your drink order.  You order through your favorite waiter, Andrew, who recommends the special of the day: prime rib with a dinner salad and a chocolate torte for dessert. Soon after, the food is brought out and it is delicious!  You have time to enjoy your food.  You then receive the bill and pay for your meal, returning to your home satisfied, all your dining needs met.  Let’s say, for simplicity’s sake, you paid $75 for this meal: $50 for the steak, $10 for the salad and $15 for the dessert.

A change then occurs in the restaurant industry.  A new form of eating out has been adopted.  Your favorite restaurant has now contracted with over 30 different ”restaurant insurance companies.”

Anticipating another pleasant dining experience, your return to the restaurant with your new “subscribers card.” You pay your $5 “copay.” You sit in the foyer of the restaurant. You wait an hour, even though you made reservations.  A harried Andrew greets you and quickly takes your order after you briefly glance at the menu.  The food arrives at your table.  As you take your second bite, Andrew informs you that “your time is up” and the table is reserved for another party.  You are escorted outside with your hastily boxed left-overs.

What has happened to the restaurant?  Behind the scenes, the restaurant owner has learned some tough realities of the “new system.”  During the first month of taking insurance, the owner sends a form to the insurance company requesting payment for the $75 steak dinner: $50 for the steak, $10 for the salad and $15 for the torte.  The contract with the insurance company already states that they will only pay $45 for the $50 steak, but the owner decides that the extra customers brought to the restaurant by contracting with this insurance company will more than off-set this small loss.

The first attempt at collecting the $75 dollars for the full meal is returned unpaid with the note that it was rejected due to a “coding error.”  The forms for payment from the insurance company require the owner to list the parts of the meal, not by name, but by the numerical codes. The owner had listed the salad by the wrong numerical code.  No suggestions for the correct code are offered, so the restaurant owner purchases a series of books, at a cost of $500, to learn how to assign the correct code to the different parts of the meals.  These books will need to be bought annually due to the constant changing of the code numbers. After 30 minutes of study, the owner realizes the dinner salad should be coded as a 723.13, not the723.1 the owner originally put on the form.  The salad, it turns out, needed to have two digits after the decimal point, indicating that it was a dinner salad, and not a “main course” salad.  The owner mails the corrected form.

In response to the second request for payment, the insurance company does not send a check, but a detailed questionnaire:  Was garlic used in seasoning the steak?  Was it necessary to use garlic for this particular recipe?  Did the restaurant ask for permission to use garlic from the insurance company before serving the steak? Why was salt, a less expensive alternative, not used instead? The owner submits the answers, emphasizing that the garlic is part of a secret family recipe that made the restaurant famous.

The owner waits another week (it has now been 3 weeks since the dinner was served).  The check arrives three and a half weeks after the meal was served.  The check is for $20 and states that it is specifically for the steak.  The check also comes with a letter stating that no billing of the patron may occur for the salad, but no other explanation is enclosed.  No mention is made of the $15 dessert.

The now frustrated restaurant owner calls the provider service number listed in the contract. After five separate phone calls to five different numbers (The harried voice behind phone call number four explains that the insurance company has merged with another insurance company and the phone numbers had all changed last week, sorry for the inconvenience…), the owner gets to ask why, when the contract says the steak will be paid at $45, has the check only been written for $20?  And what happened to the payment for the $10 salad and the $15 dessert?

As it turns out, this particular patron’s insurance contract only pays $45 when the patron has reached their deductible, which this patron has not at this time.  The remaining portion of payment for the steak must now be billed by the restaurant to the patron directly.

The $10 for the salad would have been paid if the patron had ordered it on a different day, but, per page 35 in the contract, because it was billed on the same day as the steak, it is considered to be part of the payment for the steak and no extra money can be collected from the patron or the insurance company.

The dessert, the owner learns, should have had a “modifier” number put with its particular billing code when billed with the steak and the salad.

Realizing that the insurance billing is quite a bit harder than anticipated, the restaurant owner hires a company, who is paid 5% of any money collected to specifically make sure these coding errors do not occur again and follow up on payment rejections.  For an additional $99 per month, the billing company will “scrub” the forms submitted for payment to make sure specific clerical errors will not cause future delays in payment.

The owner now must lay off the hostess and the bus boy to pay the billing company, so these duties are now added to the waiter’s other responsibilities.

In the meantime, the restaurant owner has also had the waiter take on the job of answering the phones due to the now high volume of phone calls from patrons questioning why they are receiving bills for meals they ate over two months ago, and why did their insurance company not pay for this portion of the meal?  This extra work is now resulting in longer times patrons must wait to be seated, and grumblings from the waiters who “were not hired or trained to do this kind of work.”

The owner now realizes that, although the dinner originally cost $75 to make, only $25 has been paid. The remaining $30 billed to the patron is now in its third mailing, with the first two requests for payment going unanswered by the patron.  The restaurant owner realizes a collection agency must be employed in order to have any hope of receiving any portion of payment from the patron.

Each meal served now costs at least an additional $20 due to the added overhead of the billing company, coding books, and the collection agency.  These added expenses have nothing to do with cooking food or providing any direct service to the restaurant’s customers.

Service to the restaurant’s patrons has been compromised with these changes as well. The owner has now over-extended the waiter, who was an excellent waiter, but is now taking on the roles of host, phone answering and table bussing.

In order to even meet the costs of providing fine dining, the restaurant owner now must seat twice as many patrons in the same amount of time.

What was once an outstanding business that focused on fine dining and customer service has now been turned into a business in the business of trying to get paid.

Alas, I wish this were a fictional tale, but it is not.  The only fictional portion is that this is not your favorite restaurant, but your favorite doctor’s office, which is responsible not for meeting your dining needs, but those of your health.

Megan Lewis, M.D.

A family physician in rural Colorado.

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